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More Flints

I’m not sure if I have ever made as many versions of a pattern in quick succession as I have the Flint pants/shorts deisgn by Megan Nielsen. I made them up the first time shortly after the pattern had been released and had arrived in my mailbox (I already had my pretty cotton silk from The Fabric Store washed and waiting), and I wrote about them here. The pattern was a huge success- the fit was spot on with very minor adjustments (I think I took about 3/8 inch of fabric out of the waistline and graded down to nothing at my high hip), the wide leg was comfortable and didn’t make me feel like I was swimming in fabric, and I loved the unique closure of the design- although the left side pocket is essentially not very useful since it remains open on the inside of the pants, it means that the design doesn’t need a zipper. Instead, the pants close with either a tie or a couple of buttons. I’ve seen this design element in vintage clothing before and I love that Megan Nielsen updated the silhouette a bit while keeping the interest of the side closure as is.

Flint pattern photo from envelope

For my second pair I was hoping to recreate the look of the design on the pattern envelope- the pants are made from a bleached looking denim that looks very soft and flowy. I chose a denim from The Fabric Store that had a similar color but ignored the stiffer hand it had- I figured that the denim was lightweight enough that I could wash it and it would look floaty just like in the photos. I was totally wrong, and annoyed with myself for not knowing better. When I completed the pants and tried them on, the fabric was stiff and barely moved, and it made me look like I had put on cardboard pants. Obviously not the look I was going for. But all was not lost! In a last minute attempt to save the garment, I chopped the legs off mid thigh at the cutting line on the pattern that separates the shorts from the pants, and now they look fantastic.

The stiff denim works really well for shorts, I think- it helps them maintain their silhouette, they don’t wrinkle quite as much as a softer, drapier fabric would, and they look a bit like sailor pants- which is why I decided to mirror the buttons on the right side of the shorts. I am pretty sure that Megan Nielsen shared this button look on her instagram account which is what gave me the idea. I had cute red buttons that looked really nice with the light colored denim but I didn’t want to take the sailor analogy TOO literally (I’ve never really been a fan of red/white/blue combos in my clothing), so I opted for these vintage pale peach ones I found at an antique store last year. I am in love with the soft, beachy look they lend to the shorts- it makes me think of seashells on the seashore.

Aside from using the button closure on this version of the design, I also eliminated the release tucks at the front of the pants to give a smoother line from waistband to thigh. Megan Nielsen posted an easy-t0-follow tutorial on her blog about how to create darts out of those tucks although I somehow managed to make mine very long? Despite, I swear, following the instructions to a T?? Whatever, I totally don’t mind the length of the darts as they are barely noticeable and actually make the shorts look like they are made of panels, which is pretty cute.

Ok, so YAY, shorts! Good save with a chop off of the pants legs, and I absolutely love how cute and fun they are- I get so many compliments when I wear them! But wait, what about the dream pants version that I still have yet to make out of a flowy, looser kind of fabric that drapes over my frame and mirrors the pants from the pattern front? What about those guys??

Well I made those guys, too! This time out of a coffee colored cotton linen from…where else? Your favorite place and mine, THE FABRIC STORE! They have an incredible selection of linen in their store pretty much year round in Los Angeles because it’s basically always linen weather here, and this bolt stood out to me because of it’s a neutral but with a visually interesting textured weave, and it’s super light weight. Of course, when I finished the garment and hung them in my closet, I discovered that the fabric is incredibly similar to the cotton linen I used for my Burda Wide Legged pants, blogged here. Coincidence? Probably not. I tend to keep neutral or darker colors on my bottom half when they are pants and in a shape I am not completely familiar with. It would be nice to step out of that habit, but I love how both pairs of pants came out, so if it ain’t broke…! Anyways, I figured these would be a nice fabric to make Flint in, especially for an LA summer (I hate wearing pants in the summer cause I get so hot but I also hate my legs burning in the sun and sticking to leather and plastic seats all the time, so I am hoping that this version finds a nice balance in the midst of the worst parts of 90 degree weather).

I released the tuck pleats again in exchange for the darts, kept them at the full pants length with a couple inches taken out of the thigh area to accommodate my shortness, and went back to the tie at the side waist. I made these, from start to finish, in one afternoon in my sewing room; easy breezy!

These have that coveted rumpled-but-still-put-together look I see certain people pull off all the time, those people that look like they have the busiest lives ever but still seem to manage to keep it all together. My life isn’t nearly that busy, but I do like throwing on an outfit that looks (and is) effortless. It just gives me more time to do what I got to do and then get back home and sew! When I first made this version of the Flint, I styled them all wrong. I tried to dress them up a little for my first wearing and I wore my lace-up espadrilles and a cap sleeved Burda top in pink, and it was just ALL WRONG. It looked too….mature, I guess is the best word. It probably doesn’t help that I wore this outfit to the mall on Mother’s Day, so I was surrounded by lots of other ladies in “mature” outfits, but it just wasn’t looking hip enough. I realized that I needed to keep these pants casual and pair them with other dressed down things. My current favorite top is this shark tank top in musician Jenny Owens Young’s online merch shop, you can find it and other cute tees, hats and tanks here!

Now I swear I’m done with the Flint! I have made every version I could possibly need for my closet at this point- a fancy pant, a casual pant, plus a dress-up-or-down-short, and I am very happy with them! According to instagram, Megan Nielsen has a new pattern to release in the next month or so and I am super excited to see what it is- will it become a wardrobe staple for me the way the Flint has?? How many “staples” can one have in their wardrobe before it becomes excessive, anyways? I. AM. TOEING. THE. LINE. But who cares; at least I will look good doing it 😉

Flint Cropped Pants in Silk Cottton

pattern: Megan Nielsen’s Flint Pants

fabric: cotton silk from The Fabric Store in Los Angeles

I’ve known about Megan Nielsen’s patterns for a while, but the only one I had in my pattern stash was the Cascade Skirt, which I accidentally didn’t get enough fabric for when I tried to make it years ago, so I had to cut the pieces out incorrectly and piece them together in an attempt to save the project- it was wonky but it might have worked if I hadn’t tried to use a rolling hem foot (which I had never used before) on very my lightweight fabric. The hem was a disaster and I’m still unsure why- maybe the wrong fabric coupled with inexperience with a foot that requires a bit more precision than usual? Whatever the reason, by this time in the skirt making process I was completely fed up- the fabric had been gnawed, puckered and split in so many places at the hem that it looked beyond saving, so I threw it out, saving as many pieces of the fabric as I could  and moved on to something else. None of this of course had to do with the pattern itself but I felt so disappointed in the project that I kind of just tuned out anything that reminded me of it.

Thankfully enough time has passed and my sewing ego has recuperated enough to recognize that the failure was all mine and my heart is open once again to Megan’s beautiful designs, which I must admit, are much more eye-catching than ever with her recent pattern and website rebranding. Amazing what a huge effect that has on the consumer! So now I am digging through her archives to see what other designs I might have skimmed over or dismissed in the past (and for the record, I have every intention of giving the Cascade Skirt another try as soon as I find the right fabric for it).

When Megan announced the Flint Pants pattern on instagram, I thought fate must be intervening because I had only a few days before drawn out a bunch of pattern silhouettes and designs for projects on my Sewing TO-DO list. A had a fancy wide legged trouser pattern drawn out in addition to another culotte-ish wide leg pant that I intended to wear more casually.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BRRiPaNhWCR/?taken-by=jasikaistrycurious

I had an idea of the pattern that I wanted for the culottes but I wasn’t quite sold on it- it was a random pattern that I bought at a Big 4 Sale and it was cute enough but I wasn’t sure if that was the look I actually wanted or if it was just the pattern I had (common sewist’s dilemma, I’m sure). So when Flint came into my line of vision and I was immediately hooked on the sleek look of the fit coupled with the casual feeling of the pants, I figured I should abandon my earlier instinct and go with my gut. And I am so glad that I did!

It’s funny to talk about how I was drawn to this pattern because of the casual feeling it embodies when I sewed mine up in such a non-casual fabric. But I was in LOVE with this fabric when I first saw it at The Fabric Store and I wanted to sew something up in it right away. Once I made the pants and discovered how much I loved the fit of the pattern, I knew I would be making them up again in the future so I didn’t feel bad that my first version came out a little fancier than intended. The fabric is an extraordinary cotton silk which has a crisp hand and a very soft sheen (softer than what shows up in these photos). It feels silky and soft to the touch but not as precious as say, a charmeuse- it feels wearable without feeling dressed down. The colors are what put it over the edge into heart-eyes-emoji territory though; this is a blue that I don’t see a lot. I don’t know how to describe it, but it has a slight darkness to it, a tiny bit of midnight blue and gray mixed together (this is actually my favorite color for a house and when we get ours repainted I will have to work long and hard to convince Claire to let us go in this direction). Anyways, I don’t have a lot of blue in my wardrobe because it’s not a color that I am drawn to very often, but this pretty shade coupled with that pop of pink in the flowers? SWOON!

Again, these pants came out more fancy than I intended, and I am really in love with that bleached denim pair on the pattern envelope so I have a feeling those might be next for me, although the closer it gets to summer the more insufferable wearing pants will be in this city, so I might have to compromise and make shorts for my next version of this pattern. I’m sticking to the soft, bleached denim look, though- if I can find it!

As a make, these pants were incredibly fast and easy to sew up and the instructions were excellent and left me with only one head-scratching moment (which I pretty quickly figured out, as it came from a minor adjustment I had made). I was so excited to make these pants that I totally forgot to tissue fit them before I cut my fabric out, so I felt nervous about what the fit would be like as I began to sew them. The sizing for this pattern is XS-XL which, in my experience in pretty rare for a non-knit sewing pattern, but all my measurements fit perfectly into the S category which meant no grading for me. I baste fit the pants together, tried them on, and, miracle of miracles!, they fit really well! I needed to take the waist seams in about 3/8″ or so on either side but everything else was perfect- the crotch depth, the release tucks in the front and the darts on the back. I forgot to apply the changes from the waist of my pants to the actual waistband so when I went to pin that pattern piece to the pants it was too long (hence the head-scratching), but the fix was easy, I just had to chop off a bit of the length at the front edge of the waistband and move my button and button hole marks to match. And I was thrilled to see a pants pattern with diagonal pockets that didn’t gape out on me! As discussed in my last post, I have issues with these types of pockets if the pants are super fitted, but this design has a very loose fit through the hips and thighs and my pockets have stayed in place quite nicely, even without twill tape stabilizing the seam.

I love everything about this pattern- the loose fit that makes it look like you’re wearing a skirt if you stand still with your legs together, the button and tie closure at the side, the smart use of pockets (for the record the pocket at the tie closure side isn’t really useful for putting anything other than your hand in because it opens to the inside of the pants, which is how you get in and out of them, but the pocket on the other side is perfect for putting things into). As I said, I am really excited to make this pattern again. As I said, I should make the shorts next, but I am dying to try the pants in a softer fabric with a slightly shorter hem and with a slightly narrower leg. This make was much quicker than I anticipated and is easy to complete in a day of sewing, even with my french seaming, which has become my go-to finish for pretty much every woven project I tackle. I just love how neat, clean and professional the insides look when I step into a garment that has all those pretty closed seams on the inside.

I highly recommend this new Megan Nielsen pattern, and I am excited to add a few more versions of it to my closet which, by the way, is completely stocked up on sundresses and cute skirts, while the lightweight pants/shorts category has been severely lacking…but thankfully not for long!