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Jenny Overalls

I have made three pairs of overalls that have a straightforward, utilitarian design- not a lot of frills or shaping (which is what I wanted at the time)- two for me and one for Claire. I blogged about the makes for myself with the Turia dungarees here and here and I wear both pairs an awful lot- they are much loved and much worn (despite a few issues I had with the finishing techniques in the pattern. But when Closet Case Files came out with the Jenny Overalls earlier this year, I was super excited to make them because they have such a cool shape and style, with a more aesthetically interesting flourish than the pairs I had made before.

The Jenny’s have a bib and separated bib pocket on the front, but they don’t have a back piece; instead, the straps are placed at the back of the pants waistband and criss cross over the shoulders to connect at the front bib. I love that detail because it doesn’t cover up the whole body in the way that many overalls designs do, and it allows you to show off a pretty shirt or tank with some interesting detailing or print.

 

The pants have slant side pockets which I also love, but my favorite thing about this pattern is the way the pants are drafted- the legs are slim in the hips but wide through the thigh/knee/calf, and it gives the whole look a bit of a vintage flair. They also sit high on the waist and aren’t slouchy like most overalls patterns can be. Again, I love the old school overalls look, with their ease of wear and wide waist- my Turia Dungarees can be thrown on over a tank top, paired with some Birkenstocks or sneakers, and I can be out the door in no time, looking comfortable and cute. But the Jenny’s feel fashion forward in a way that my Turias don’t, and I just LOVE having these options in my wardrobe.

I decided not to overfit the waistband of my Jenny Overalls and allow a little bit of extra room for movement, comfort and tucking a shirt in them, but they are still much more snug at the waist and hips than my Turias. I opted for the functional slant pockets (you can also omit them), the topstitched faux fly on the front, faux flat felled seams, and one side zipper (I thought I would need two, which is an offered option that I deeply appreciate since I have a hard time getting into snug high waist pants with my hips, but since I made the waistband a little looser than normal, I was able to get away with just one).

An option is also provided to use jeans buttons at the hips instead of zips, and Heather sells overalls and jeans buttons hardware from her store, which I quickly snatched up (the Dritz overalls buckles that I bought and used for an earlier pair of overalls have held up fine, but have never felt as sturdy or looked as nice as I wanted them to).

The instructions for this pattern are, like all CFF designs, straight forward, and easy to follow. Sewing and topstitching a multi-faceted make like this is SO FUN, especially when you trust the designer and don’t feel like you have to keep your eyes out for missing steps or finishes. The only issue I had with these (and I had the same issue when I made Claire the Jenny shorts this summer) is the zipper insertion at the side seams. Because of the thick denim coupled with the pocket lining, the seams are really bulky and it was hard for me to get the topstitching around the zipper perfectly straight, although I did the best job I could. I don’t think the zipper detracts at all from the overall look of the garment, meaning it isn’t noticeable and the stitching doesn’t look painfully wobbly- as least not by the Three Feet Rule, haha.

I used the mint green Cone Mills colored denim that Threadbare Fabrics has been keeping in their shop this summer and it has been an excellent pairing with this pattern- the denim is on the lighter side of mid-weight but still firm and stable, so it doesn’t make these overalls feel too bulky or heavy, which is important to me since I will be wearing them in a fairly climate.

Figuring out the hem of these pants was tough for me- originally I had planned to make the cropped version, but since I started making these overalls right after I had made the Molyneux for Vogue Dress-Turned-Jumpsuit (in which I hacked the cropped length of the Jenny pants onto the Molyneux bodice), I realized I wanted to use a different silhouette so I didn’t have two versions of the same jumpsuit in my closet.

I am really glad I went with the full length- it will allow me to wear these overalls far deeper into the Cali winter than my cropped version would have permitted (and perhaps into the winters of other cities, too??). I couldn’t decide if I wanted to have the ground skimming hem or a slightly higher hem that shows more of the shoe, but wide legged pants hems are ALWAYS very tricky for me, and I have to be very specific about which shoes I will be wearing with said pants before dedicating myself to the length. Once I realized that these overalls matched best with my heeled booties as opposed to my clogs, the hem length made itself very obvious- the longer, floor skimming length was perfect!

The days are finally cooling down now (and for LA that means high 70s) so these overalls are prime fall attire. In these photos I paired them with a pink Niko top by True Bias I made last year, but I just recently sewed up a replica of this sleeveless turtleneck in a cream colored 1×1 rib from The Fabric Store that I think is going to look amazing and make me look a tiny bit less like an easter egg. I will surely grace instagram with this completed look soon, so keep an eye out!

Perspephone Pants

When I first saw the Persephone Pants by Anna Allen making the rounds on instagram and the blog world, I assumed they were a part of a bandwagon that I needed to stay off of. I had learned my lesson with the Terra Pants earlier this year, a slouchy, drop-crotched tailored pants pattern that people were head over heels for, but that looked absolutely HORRIBLE on me when I made them up. Construction-wise they were beautiful and the process was really fun, but they just didn’t hit any part of my body in the way they were supposed to. Not everything is made for everybody, and that’s an important lesson to learn. But another important lesson? Just because you think they aren’t for you doesn’t mean that they won’t be- sometimes it’s just a crapshoot and you have to take the risk!

I’m really really really glad that I decided to give the Persephone Pants a try because on paper they were not going to be an ideal match for me. The silhouette looked cool on the models in the photos for the pattern but I was afraid they were going to completely engulf my small frame with the width of those legs paired with the ankle length crop. But what seemed even more problematic for me was the the design element that had made them so popular- they don’t have side seams! The pants are only connected at the inseam and the crotch, which gives the pants a very streamlined, funky look, but for someone like me who has a 2 size difference between waist and hips, I rely heavily on side seams to get a good fit around my hips and thighs, so the absence of them seemed like it was just going to create a massive headache and an unwearable garment, much like those beautiful Terra Pants.

But then I saw lady Katie of WhatKatieSews rocking them on IG and talking them up big time. I recalled that she usually had to grade patterns for a size difference between her waist and hips and I asked her how she was able to accommodate her figure without use of the side seams. She responded that because there are back waist darts, she was able to modify them to nip in more where she needed them to and the alteration was easy and successful. Hmmm…intriguing! But dare I rely on one sole person who happens to look amazing in them? Everyone looked amazing in the Terra Pants, too….everyone except me!

And then I came across a blog post written by a Very Purple Person. She too looked amazing in her Persephones, but she also shared her measurements (something I have only recently realized can be incredibly helpful information to share in blog posts!) which were the same as mine, and this was the last nudge I needed. If her hips and waist could accommodate the darts and lack of side seams then I imagined I would fare just as well as she did, and thankfully I was right, because I really love these pants!

First I made them in a mid-to-heavy weight denim that I found at Joann’s when on a run for notions. I rarely fabric shop at Joann’s because the quality of the bolts can be all over the place- don’t get me wrong, they have some great finds on their shelves, but I have always had to hunt really hard for them, and with a (now sadly, defunct) The Fabric Store nearby, my time was always better spent in a curated shop. Anyways, I just so happened to run into Mimi G on this day that I made a run to my local Joann’s, and she had found the prettiest pineapple-print rayon that she was going to make into a shirt dress, so I felt inspired to spend a little time roaming the aisles to find something good for my project. To be fair, their selection of denim and twill is always pretty decent, because those seem to be good workhorse fabrics that everyone likes to sew with. I really like the blue color of this 100% cotton denim, which was slightly bleached-looking and gave me serious 80’s vibes as soon as I saw it.

The denim was great to sew with and the construction was mostly straightforward til I got to the button fly insertion. Now I had read on several blog posts that these instructions were particularly clear and concise and that people who had trouble inserting button-flies on other projects got through this with a breeze. I myself had done a few successful button flies and tons of zipper flies at this point so I had no doubt that I would fly (ba-dum-ching) through this part. Imagine my surprise when I simply could not make the pieces lay down right and get my topstitching to look clean at all. I took the damn thing out three times but still! I could not get it right!

The only major difference I could tell from making this fly and the countless others in my arsenal was that I usually sew the crotch seam of the front pieces together in the first step- I baste the fly extensions together til the bottom of the extension shape, where they curve and meet the crotch seam, then I change to a regular stitch to sew the remainder of the seam, and then I sew in my zipper. But if I remember these steps correctly (since I made these a few months ago), the Persephone pants instruct you to complete the whole zip insertion before sewing the two front pattern pieces together at the crotch. In doing that it was really difficult for me to get my sewing needle all the way up to the point where the fly extension ends and becomes the crotch seam, because the button fly and extension pieces were so bulky. So there was always a tiny little gap right beneath it that would look even more obvious once I tried to topstitch over it. After two unsuccessful tries, the only way I could make it look right was to take the whole thing out, sew the bottom part of the seam first as I usually do, and then re-insert the zipper.

I have seen several people’s finished Persephones and they all look amazing, including their button flies, and I only saw one other person comment on my IG about having a lot of difficulty with this part of the instructions, so I am going to chalk my issue up to either user error or ultra bulky fabric, but it still seems worth mentioning here in my blog post. And after all that, I have actually decided that I DON’T LIKE the button fly at all! It looks great as a design choice, but as far as wearing them (and this might also be due to my fairly thick denim), after a couple of hours of movement, the fly gets a lot of creases and folds and the whole crotch area starts to look bulky and a bit sloppy. I never even considered changing out the jeans buttons for regular flat buttons as another brilliant blogger on instagram did, which keeps the whole area looking a bit flatter, but even so, I decided to make my second pair of these (the yellow denim) using a zip fly with my preferred method of insertion.

I also lengthened the fly, since I need more room to get these hips into such a small waistband, used my curved waistband, and added some pockets to the back, which I think worked out very well. The curved waistband didn’t change the fit at all since the pants sit so high and I don’t really curve like that around my abdomen, but I will keep all the other changes I made for future pairs. The fabric for these is the goldenrod Cone Mills denim that Threadbare Fabrics has been carrying in her shop, and once it arrived in the mail, I decided to use the wrong side of the denim on a whim. The goldenrod is beautiful and vibrant, but I liked the pastel hue of the “wrong” side a lot, and I am so pleased with my decision! One weird thing that happened during construction of my golden pair was that I cut out the cropped length of these pants as opposed to the regular length (which is how I cut out my first pair- what the heck happened?!) and I didn’t realize it until it was too late. Unfortunately the shorter length was NOT okay on me, so I had to cut out a cuff to make up for the lost length, and lop it onto the bottom of the legs. I was afraid that it would look really obvious and be distracting, but holy cow you can’t even see it in these pictures, and even close up it looks like a subtle design choice.

Fly preference and construction aside, these pants for me were a relatively quick make, and I am still amazed at how easy it was to fit a pair of pants on this booty without any side seams while still getting a smooth and sleek silhouette. I love the pocket construction in the front- I can’t fit much more than a tube of chapstick and some dollar bills in there but I love that they are hidden and don’t interrupt the lines of the garment while still offering at least something in the ways of clothing storage, haha. A lot of sewists compare this pattern to the Landers by True Bias (made here) which are also a really fantastic wide legged silhouette with a more traditional design, namely side seams and back pockets. Although they are super similar, I think I like the Persephones a little more- the waist comes up a bit higher on me which I always love, but the shape of the leg is different- the Landers have the tiniest hint of a flare at the bottom of the leg but the Perspehones go straight down from the thigh to the ankle, and I personally think that’s a bit more flattering on my short body.

My blue pair is really comfortable but gets a little saggy after a couple of wears and my yellow pair fits much more snugly but can cut a bit into my belly if I am sitting in a weird position (i.e. slumped, which is my fav stance, lol). Maybe my third pair will be the perfect balance between the two? Fingers crossed! Oh, and before I forget- the pink mules paired with the blue denim are me-made as are the orange and brown sandals with the yellow pair of persephones, and the blue FLINT t-shirt is RTW while the cropped white shirt is my first Kalle!

PS Just realized that after all that talk about how nice it is to know someone’s measurements accompanied with their makes, I forgot to mention mine, lol. Waist is 26.5 and hips are 37!