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Jenny Overalls

I have made three pairs of overalls that have a straightforward, utilitarian design- not a lot of frills or shaping (which is what I wanted at the time)- two for me and one for Claire. I blogged about the makes for myself with the Turia dungarees here and here and I wear both pairs an awful lot- they are much loved and much worn (despite a few issues I had with the finishing techniques in the pattern. But when Closet Case Files came out with the Jenny Overalls earlier this year, I was super excited to make them because they have such a cool shape and style, with a more aesthetically interesting flourish than the pairs I had made before.

The Jenny’s have a bib and separated bib pocket on the front, but they don’t have a back piece; instead, the straps are placed at the back of the pants waistband and criss cross over the shoulders to connect at the front bib. I love that detail because it doesn’t cover up the whole body in the way that many overalls designs do, and it allows you to show off a pretty shirt or tank with some interesting detailing or print.

 

The pants have slant side pockets which I also love, but my favorite thing about this pattern is the way the pants are drafted- the legs are slim in the hips but wide through the thigh/knee/calf, and it gives the whole look a bit of a vintage flair. They also sit high on the waist and aren’t slouchy like most overalls patterns can be. Again, I love the old school overalls look, with their ease of wear and wide waist- my Turia Dungarees can be thrown on over a tank top, paired with some Birkenstocks or sneakers, and I can be out the door in no time, looking comfortable and cute. But the Jenny’s feel fashion forward in a way that my Turias don’t, and I just LOVE having these options in my wardrobe.

I decided not to overfit the waistband of my Jenny Overalls and allow a little bit of extra room for movement, comfort and tucking a shirt in them, but they are still much more snug at the waist and hips than my Turias. I opted for the functional slant pockets (you can also omit them), the topstitched faux fly on the front, faux flat felled seams, and one side zipper (I thought I would need two, which is an offered option that I deeply appreciate since I have a hard time getting into snug high waist pants with my hips, but since I made the waistband a little looser than normal, I was able to get away with just one).

An option is also provided to use jeans buttons at the hips instead of zips, and Heather sells overalls and jeans buttons hardware from her store, which I quickly snatched up (the Dritz overalls buckles that I bought and used for an earlier pair of overalls have held up fine, but have never felt as sturdy or looked as nice as I wanted them to).

The instructions for this pattern are, like all CFF designs, straight forward, and easy to follow. Sewing and topstitching a multi-faceted make like this is SO FUN, especially when you trust the designer and don’t feel like you have to keep your eyes out for missing steps or finishes. The only issue I had with these (and I had the same issue when I made Claire the Jenny shorts this summer) is the zipper insertion at the side seams. Because of the thick denim coupled with the pocket lining, the seams are really bulky and it was hard for me to get the topstitching around the zipper perfectly straight, although I did the best job I could. I don’t think the zipper detracts at all from the overall look of the garment, meaning it isn’t noticeable and the stitching doesn’t look painfully wobbly- as least not by the Three Feet Rule, haha.

I used the mint green Cone Mills colored denim that Threadbare Fabrics has been keeping in their shop this summer and it has been an excellent pairing with this pattern- the denim is on the lighter side of mid-weight but still firm and stable, so it doesn’t make these overalls feel too bulky or heavy, which is important to me since I will be wearing them in a fairly climate.

Figuring out the hem of these pants was tough for me- originally I had planned to make the cropped version, but since I started making these overalls right after I had made the Molyneux for Vogue Dress-Turned-Jumpsuit (in which I hacked the cropped length of the Jenny pants onto the Molyneux bodice), I realized I wanted to use a different silhouette so I didn’t have two versions of the same jumpsuit in my closet.

I am really glad I went with the full length- it will allow me to wear these overalls far deeper into the Cali winter than my cropped version would have permitted (and perhaps into the winters of other cities, too??). I couldn’t decide if I wanted to have the ground skimming hem or a slightly higher hem that shows more of the shoe, but wide legged pants hems are ALWAYS very tricky for me, and I have to be very specific about which shoes I will be wearing with said pants before dedicating myself to the length. Once I realized that these overalls matched best with my heeled booties as opposed to my clogs, the hem length made itself very obvious- the longer, floor skimming length was perfect!

The days are finally cooling down now (and for LA that means high 70s) so these overalls are prime fall attire. In these photos I paired them with a pink Niko top by True Bias I made last year, but I just recently sewed up a replica of this sleeveless turtleneck in a cream colored 1×1 rib from The Fabric Store that I think is going to look amazing and make me look a tiny bit less like an easter egg. I will surely grace instagram with this completed look soon, so keep an eye out!

Kalle Shirtdress

Remember this fiasco from a couple of months ago? Well, despite my best intentions to adjust the awful fit, I couldn’t save it, at least not enough for wearing in public. It has been relegated to house attire (with the occasional last minute run to the post office if necessary), and I don’t feel good about it; I was really looking forward to that silhouette having some heavy rotation in my closet! Anyways, you can imagine my excitement (and regret) when shortly after I posted the dress onto my blog, Closet Case introduced their newest pattern, the Kalle Shirtdress and Shirt. It is essentially everything right about the original McCalls dress I made with none of the wrong. Having lots of success with Closet Case’s past patterns in terms of fit and design, I knew it was going to fill the hole that Everyone’s Favorite Dress left in my life, but little did I know that it was going to add something that I didn’t even know I needed…more on that in a later blog post.

Here’s how the shirt dress of this pattern is similar to the McCalls version- kimono style short sleeves, an ever-so-slightly high-lo, hidden button placket (there are two other options for the button band included in the pattern), and a loose, breezy fit. But the hem isn’t ridiculously dramatic on the Kalle, it doesn’t include unnecessary side slits, the invisible placket actually conceals the buttons underneath (although I totally goofed this part of the pattern up during construction, but more on that later, too), and most importantly, it isn’t drafted bigger in the upper back than in the waist and hips, so the back pattern piece of the Kalle drapes beautifully, barely skimming the figure underneath.

After making the Hannah dress, I have been completely intrigued with so-called “sack dresses” that make me feel sexy while also providing ease and comfort (not sure sure if these patterns actually ID as “sack dresses” but I call anything that is short and slouchy in the mid-section a sack dress). Anyways, the Kalle shirt dress pattern felt like a gift from the Gods and a chance to redeem myself from my last attempt at that McCalls’ disaster.

And now for the fabric! I love this part! So I had recently tried my hand at sandwashing some turquoise silk crepe de chine from The Fabric Store using soda ash and a hot water cycle on the washing machine and was pretty amazed at how excellent the effect was. My once sleek, shiny silk was suddenly matte and soft and slightly sueded looking and it cost me like, 20 cents to create. The cool thing about sandwashed fabric is that it can be washed in the machine and dried in the dryer, so even though I was aiming for a casual Kalle, I figured that the fabric could pull double duty as a slightly fancy make, too. I love the drapey-ness of the pattern paired with this silk but I wished that I would have used my fabric stiffener on the silk before sewing it up. The fabric was much less silky and tricky to work with after it was sandwashed, but it still wasn’t as easy as working with a cotton- the stiffener would have made it even more manageable (and would have made my button band look a lot better than it turned out).

I didn’t run into much trouble until I was making the concealed placket, which requires some precise ironing and folding that was hard to achieve with my silk, which kept sliding around everywhere. Because of this, I don’t think that the folds are as straight as they could be, and on top of that, I made a VERY ROOKIE mistake when it came to making the buttonholes. The instructions suggest that you make them before attaching the placket to the dress but I prefer to make mine towards the end of construction, and I wish I had followed my instincts. Somehow I ended up not sewing the holes through both folds of the placket, and instead I made and cut out holes for only one side (like I said, rookie mistake!) Once I attached the band to the dress front, I realized I had messed up and had to do some weird MacGuyver-ing to make it work, which included adding an additional set of buttonholes on the band behind the one I had already made, which of course didn’t line up perfectly with the front holes and in turn makes the band sit a little awkwardly on the front.

But! I blame this mistake on the fact that I decided to make both the Kalle shirt (a future blog post!) and the shirtdress at the same time. Normally I love knocking out more than one project from a pattern at a time (done it a million times with the Archer pattern from Grainline and the Hudson pants from True Bias) but I now know it’s a better idea to save the multiple constructions for a pattern I have made at least once before. My two-for-one Kalle session ended up being especially tricky for me since I sewed up two different button band and collar options for the shirt and dress, and it was tough to keep the instructions straight.

Aside from the snafu with the button band (which, by the way, was still a million times easier to follow than the McCalls one), construction was easy and well described. I have made more button down shirts for my wife than I can count so I was already familiar with a lot of the techniques used in this pattern, and since this is technically a sleeveless garment, construction is pretty fast when not having to account for a set-in sleeve, cuffs and sleeve plackets.

So, in a word? YES! YES I LOVE THIS PATTERN (and I haven’t even talked about my Kalle shirt yet!) I love everything about it, and it really is exactly what I was hoping for when I initially made the McCall’s dress. I loooove the drapey-ness in the back, it’s just perfect. It’s sexy and comfortable, and it looks so effortless, even in this fabric. I already know exactly what I want my next shirtdress to look like- I see it in a smokey, dark gray (maybe a muted black??) sandwashed silk again, with exposed pearl snaps, and a slightly longer length, like right below the knee, but with the same slightly hi-low hemline. I haven’t even worn this turquoise dress out yet and I’m already planning my next one…sign of a pretty fantastic pattern, right?