Coming To America

It is embarrassing how long it took me to put this little number together- I think from start to finish two and a half years passed between the skirt and the top! But better late than never, right?

I made this wrap skirt from a vintage 70’s pattern (Butterick 6809) that I saw on someone else’s blog and purchased from etsy. The skirt made me nostalgic, because even though I was a teenager in the 90s, I was always a HUGE fan of a good wrap skirt, and I collected a lot of them throughout my high school years, some from thrift stores and consignment shops, others from some of the cheap fast fashion retailers in the strip mall down the street (do any of y’all remember ‘Rainbow’? or ‘5- 7- 9’? We also had a spot in Birmingham that I loved called ‘Warehouse of Fashions’ that was filled with enough statically clung polyester to make a small army sweat profusely in a snowstorm). No one really thinks of the 90’s as being the era of the wrap skirt, but I’m here to tell you that it was! These skirts were way less stylish and fashion forward than their 70’s-centric counterparts, but they were most definitely available in RTW, often found positioned next to the infamous skorts garment, which was like a mullet for your bottom: a pair of shorts that came equipped with a flap of fabric attached to the side that could be buttoned or clipped closed at the opposite hip to make it look like a skirt in the front. I had these in denim, cotton, plaid, you name it! My love of fashion has come a long way, right? I can only imagine what kind of ensembles I would have put together if I had known how to sew way back then!

Anyways, my love for the wrap skirt waned after I got to college when my attention focused more on cheap JNCOs knock-offs and stretchy boot cut pants (sigh), but I have continued to reserve a little space for the iconic garment my heart. I like the simplicity of a wrap skirt- depending on the fabric you make it in, you can get a lot of drama out of the look, but the architecture remains simple; it’s basically a big rectangle with a long tie at the top and a hole with which to pull the tie through. I can’t remember the name of the blog that I saw this specific pattern on, but I loved how structured the skirt looked on the maker in a stiffer kind of fabric, so I immediately snapped it up to add to my pattern stash.

A little while later when I saw this bright geometric print at The Fabric Store in LA (again, from so many moons ago!), I knew it would be a great pairing of fabric and pattern. I loved the geometry of the textile, the clean white mixed with the bright gold, and it’s also reversible! It isn’t easy to tell in the pics but the main part of the skirt is made with the golder side of the fabric while the waistband and bodice are made with the whiter side (I accidentally put the skirt on the dressform inside out in the above photo so don’t pay attention to that lol). It’s a slick little design choice that doesn’t seem glaringly obvious but succeeds in breaking up the print a bit. So yeah, I knew it would be a great pairing, but I had no idea of the actual outfit I would try and create with the skirt, and once it was completed (again, this is one of the quickest garments to make, definitely a contender for easiest ‘first sewn garment’) I realized that I had no idea what to wear with it. In my head I was gonna pair it with a cute, tight t-shirt or make a nondescript silky tank that wouldn’t detract from the dramatic fabric of the skirt, but alas, I never got around to it. For one thing, I didn’t actually own the t-shirt that I was envisioning would look cute with this skirt, and if I’m honest, that kind of rock’n’roll meets couture look is not really so much my vibe anyways. And as far as the tank is concerned, I couldn’t for the life of me find a fabric that would look good with the white and gold foil.

Skip two and a half years-ish, where the wrap skirt has sat in my closet collecting dust because it doesn’t have a partner in crime yet. I had been perusing sewing blogs and I came across a lovely maker who had just recently made this MimiG crop top (Simplicity 8394) with a gigantic bow on the front. The top was adorable and sweet without looking juvenile. The blogger had paired it with a full skirt in a very pretty soft floral fabric with a bit of body, and I was in love with the whole look. I wondered what I could possibly wear with the top, which was pretty dramatic and unique in it’s style, when suddenly a flash of my gold and white wrap skirt popped into my head. Although it had been years since I had made it, I was almost positive that I had a tiny cut of the fabric left in my stash, probably enough to make this blouse, which surely didn’t require that much material.


I grabbed the pattern during the next sale at Joann’s, cut out the pattern pieces, and pulled out my remnant of fabric to see if I had enough to make it. I did. Just baaaaaaaarely. It required a very inventive cutting layout, some shaving off of certain pattern pieces, and the use of a different type of fabric to line the top with, but I made it happen! And it was just as cute as I had hoped! It has a few pieces of boning at the seams to give it some structure and help it maintain it’s shape, but it feels very comfortable and I love the length of the bodice- it’s not so high that it feels like you’re wearing a bikini top, but it is low enough that you get a little peek of belly skin, depending on what garment you are wearing on your lower half. I like that the back of the top buttons up, and I love that the bow isn’t stationary; it is sewn into the side seams, so you can tie the bow in the front or in the back, depending on your preference.

I had planned on tying the bow in the front as the pattern envelope shows, but once I paired it with the skirt, which has a wrap with a side tie, I didn’t quite like how it looked- it was overkill with two big bows screaming for attention, and this is coming from someone who LOVES bows. I was a little disappointed with the final result at first- imagine waiting nearly three years to complete an ensemble and then choosing the one pattern that doesn’t quite pair up perfectly! But then I played around with the bow placement and realized that I quite liked it when the bows were not tied on the same side (like with one in the front and the other in the back). My preference is: bodice bow in the back (party) and skirt bow in front (business). Looking at the profile I think it gives the whole look a bit of artistic flair that I wasn’t anticipating. Now I need to be real with y’all- when the bow is in the back I can’t tie it myself so I had to get Claire’s help with it, and ummm…Well, let’s just say that she doesn’t have a lot of experience tying big bows and making them look nice, even and full. That’s all I’m gonna say! I’m sure she will get better with practice LOLOLOL!

I obviously look like an extra in one of the most prolific movies of my lifetime, Coming To America, so I hope it doesn’t look too costumey because I am really digging it. The fabric isn’t an Ankara or Dutch wax print, but the bold geometry and stiffness of the fabric seems synonymous with it, particularly paired with the patterns I used. All I need is a head wrap and I will be golden! Oh man, I just realized, this would be such a great Halloween costume if I walked around in this ensemble with a basket of flower petals that I dropped all over the ground for people to walk on – I wonder if anyone would get it?

All in all, this was an easy, straightforward make, it doesn’t look like anything else in my #redcarpetDIY wardrobe, and I can’t wait to actually wear it to an event, although I will have to figure out the bow situation first. Maybe it’s because of the heaviness and stiffness of my fabric, but the bow starts to sink down a bit after a while and look pitiful, so I might need (Claire) to tie it perfectly and then sew it closed just to make sure that it stays perky, because you never know, someone might ask me to hop on one foot and bark like a dog (“a BIG dog”) and I want my outfit to pass muster 😉


Floral Play Suit

This suit has been a long time coming! I first envisioned it in my head over a year ago when I went to a screening/talk-back of our film Suicide Kale (have I mentioned lately that you can watch it on Amazon Prime and itunes now??) One of the super talented actors in our cast, Haley, was wearing THE FIERCEST ensemble, a floral suit comprised of a jacket and shorts, and I know I wasn’t the only one bombarding her with comments on how amazing she looked and how fantastic the suit was! I can’t remember where she got it- I think she said Top Shop, but that part didn’t matter since I knew that I could make it myself.

I took my time deliberating the details of this make, which is why it took so long to actually put into action, but I don’t mind- patience is often my best asset, and I think it really paid off in this case. I wasn’t deliberate about choosing my fabric, which I knew I wanted to be bright and floral; instead, I waited for the perfect print to fall into my lap, which it did earlier this year on one of my monthly trips to The Fabric Store. I came across a crisp…well, I have no idea what you would call this fabric. It has the weight of a medium-weight twill, but it’s not a twill. It’s got various sized threads running through the warp and weft which give it a substantial and interesting texture, but it’s not as stiff as the weight would have you believe. I fell in love with the color first- it’s a vivid orange that kind of toes the line between pink and red, and the large print of the yellow flowers give the fabric even more drama than the bright background color. This is the kind of bold print that matches perfectly with a bold ensemble, in my opinion. Bad news: when I washed this fabric, something bled on it. I don’t know if it was the fabric itself or a different yardage (I usually pre-wash like colors together), but the spotting throughout the fabric is dark blue, much like the dark blue stems running through the print. Because the colors are so bold and the print is so busy, it’s really hard to see the bleed if you aren’t looking for it, and you KNOW I’m not one to waste fabric. I have only had limited success using those products that are supposed to clean up bleed from your fabric, and during one employ a month or so ago, it yielded an absolute disastrous result! So I decided to forgo an attempt to clean the bleed up and just cut my losses, which I do not regret. The bleed actually reminds me of some Ankara fabrics I have seen, which sometimes bleed on different parts of the bolt in the printing process.

As for patterns, I pinned several suit jackets over the past year and finally settled on Butterick 5926, which was casual enough for the overall look I was going for but sophisticated enough to look lux! Unfortunately, it wasn’t until I was tracing my pieces that I realized the pattern was intended for knits, and my bright floral fabric was decidedly woven. Now, I know there is wiggle room between patterns meant for knits and those meant for wovens- you can usually adjust the size of a pattern to accommodate whatever kind of fabric you want, but I don’t have that much experience with those kind of alterations and wasn’t really interested in testing my learning curve on this particular project, which I had been dreaming up for so long. So I quietly cursed myself for not paying enough attention to the details, folded the pattern up, and went back to the drawing board (or rather, the pinterest board).

This time, with much fretting and hand-wringing, I settled on a Burda pattern. I won’t be a broken record and tell you for the millionth time how much I dislike working with Burda patterns, but I thought that since I had been pretty successful with my last Burda attempts (see these pants and these pants!) I could surely manage to figure this pattern out. Long story short? I was wrong. W-R-O-N-G. Bottom line for me with Burda is this: don’t attempt to make a complicated Burda pattern that you haven’t successfully constructed a few times before. Burda isn’t meant for instructing you on how to do anything new, it’s meant for the (mostly) well-drafted patterns. Everything was going fine until I got to the lapels, and then…akjshdghasjgd kjshagajsh! At one point, Burda instructed me to do the exact same step two times in a row, with different techniques; clearly someone copied and pasted from another set of instructions but didn’t edit the final draft. Thank goodness I was working from a muslin, otherwise my fabric would have been ruined, and I didn’t have any to spare.

One of the reasons I chose the Burda pattern was because it had a cute, modern shape and the material it called for was a woven, but after I started to cut the muslin fabric out, I realized that the details of the completed jacket in the photo for the pattern stated that it was made of a striped KNIT fabric. WTF?!? Which is it, Burda?? I contemplated going back to the pinterest board for a third time to hunt down yet another jacket pattern with more substantial instructions to help me on the tricky parts that were new to me (I had made only one suit jacket before  and it didn’t have traditional lapels), but ultimately I decided to go BACK to my original Butterick pattern, the one I had abandoned when I realized that it was meant for knits. After studying the pattern cover, I convinced myself that the knit fabric wasn’t drafted to be clingy or tight on the body, and reading the finished measurements on the pattern pieces, I realized that it didn’t have negative ease- the body skimming drawings on the cover were why I had picked the pattern in the first place, and they seemed to hold true to the actual design. Big 4 patterns tend to swallow me whole, no matter how perfectly I fit into the measurements for a particular size, and I hoped that the disconnect in sizing would work in my favor for once.

Thankfully, it did! The second muslin I made with the Simplicity pattern came out great and the instructions for the collar and lapels were clear. Despite being intended for knits, the jacket was still too big, specifically in the shoulders- the top of the arm dropped down too far and I had to shorten the shoulder seams a bit (an adjustment I make on almost all Big 4 patterns), but it was easy to fix. I went back and forth about whether or not I should line my jacket, but seeing as how it would be intended mostly for wear in the spring and summer, I didn’t want to make it so hot with extra fabric that it would be uncomfortable to wear. Instead, I used Hong Kong seams with bias tape on the visible inside seams and serged the others that you couldn’t see. After a quick trip to Joann’s, I found the perfect antique brass buttons for the front of the jacket, and she was complete!

For the shorts, I used a vintage TNT pattern (Simplicity 7688) that I have made a few times before with great success. I decided to omit the rectangular waistband that comes with the pattern and instead use my curved waistband from my Ginger Jeans pattern, which I love. Unfortunately, I didn’t take into account that the jeans’ waistband is drafted for pants that close in the front, and my shorts are drafted with a side zipper. DOH! I didn’t have enough fabric to recut my waistband after realizing my mistake so I had to work with what I had, which was easy enough to do but means that I have a random extra seam stuck into the waistband. Again, probably not visible to anyone looking at the shorts if I don’t point it out to them, but the other good news is that I bet you a hundred dollars I don’t make that same mistake again!

I think this ensemble would look really cute with a button down shirt underneath it when the weather gets a bit cooler, but seeing as how we are smack dab in the middle of July and first wore this outfit to SDCC a few weekends ago to promote our new Amazon kid’s show Danger & Eggs, I am opted for the most temperature appropriate version of the look, which was a simple off-white v-neck knit t shirt paired with the jacket- fabric for that shirt is from Organic Cotton Plus and pattern is the Lark Tee from Grainline Studios, which comes with several sleeve and collar options.

I am thrilled with this whole look, with the fit, and with the success of the jacket construction! And I am super excited that something that has been on my to-make list for so long actually saw the light of day! Now I just have to convince Hayley, the friend who inspired me with her own RTW shorts suit look, to head out on the town with me so we can sport them at the same time! And now to close, here is an awesome shot of our Danger & Eggs cast in one of the photos we took to promote the new show at Comic Con- I was drooling over Aidy’s outfits all weekend, they were absolutely gorgeous and I want to copy every single one!